Dr. David B. McNaughton

Dr. David B. McNaughton
Phone: 8148657159
Office Address:
227A Cedar Bldg
University Park, PA 16802
Campus: University Park

Title

Professor of Education (Special Education)

Department

Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education

Programs

Special Education

Biography

Dr. McNaughton's teaching and research focuses on the development of effective educational programs for individuals with severe disabilities. He is especially interested in the effective use of technology by individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and how AAC can be used to achieve important educational and vocational outcomes.

Office Hours

For information on my office hours please visit http://tinyurl.com/mcn-office-hours

Education History

Ph. D. (1995) Penn State University

Representative Publications

Google Scholar information for Dr David McNaughton

Benedek-Wood, E., McNaughton, D., & Light, J. (2016). Instruction in letter-sound correspondences for children with autism and limited speechTopics in Early Childhood Special Education36, 43-54.

Muttiah, N. A., McNaughton, D., & Drager, K. D. R. (2015). Providing instructional support for AAC service delivery in low- and middle-income (LAMI) countriesInternational Journal of Speech-language Pathology, 18, 341-353.

Sennott, S. C., Light, J. C., & McNaughton, D. (2016). AAC modeling intervention research reviewResearch and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities41, 101-115.

Vostal, B. R., McNaughton, D., Benedek-Wood, E., & Hoffman, K. (2015). Preparing Teachers for Collaborative Communication: Evaluation of Instruction in an Active Listening StrategyNational Teacher Education Journal8(2), 5-14.

McNaughton, D., & Light, J. (2015). What we write about when we write about AAC: The past 30 years of research and future directionsAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 31, 261-270.

Benedek-Wood, E., McNaughton, D., & Light, J. (2015). Instruction in letter-sound correspondences for children with autism and limited speechTopics in Early Childhood Special Education, early on-line.

Light, J. & McNaughton, D. (2015). Designing AAC research and intervention to improve outcomes for individuals with complex communication needs. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 31, 85-96.

Thistle, J. J., & McNaughton, D. (2015). Teaching active listening skills to pre-service speech-language pathologists: A first step in supporting collaboration with parents of young children who require AACLanguage, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools46(1), 44-55.

Worah, S., McNaughton, D., Light, J., & Benedek-Wood, E. (2015). A comparison of two approaches for representing AAC vocabulary for young childrenInternational Journal of Speech-language Pathology, 17, 460-469.

Douglas, S. N., McNaughton, D., & Light, J. (2014). Online training for paraeducators to support the communication of young children. Journal of Early Intervention, 35, 223-242.

Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2014). Communicative competence for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: A new definition for a new era of communication? Augmentative and Alternative Communication30, 1-18.

Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2014). From basic to applied research to improve outcomes for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: Potential contributions of eye tracking research methodsAugmentative and Alternative Communication30, 99-105.

Light, J. & McNaughton, D. (2013). Literacy interventions for individuals with complex communication needs. In D. Beukelman & P. Mirenda (Eds.), Augmentative and Alternative Communication. p.309-351. Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing.

Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2013). Putting people first: Re-thinking the role of technology in augmentative and alternative communication intervention. Augmentative and Alternative Communication29, 299-309.

McNaughton, D., & Chapple, D. (2013). AAC and communication in the workplacePerspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication22, 30-36.

McNaughton, D., & Light, J. (2013). The iPad and mobile technology revolution: Benefits and challenges for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communicationAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 29, 107-116.

McNaughton, D., Rackensperger, T., Dorn, D., & Wilson, N. (2013). Home is at work and work is at home: Telework and individuals who use augmentative and alternative communicationWork: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation48, 117-126.

McNaughton, D., & Richardson, L. (2013). Supporting positive employment outcomes for individuals with autism who use AACSIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 22(3), 164-172.

Douglas, S. N., Light, J. C., & McNaughton, D. B. (2012). Teaching paraeducators to support the communication of young children with complex communication needsTopics in Early Childhood Special Education.

Light, J. & McNaughton, D. (2012). Supporting the communication, language, and literacy development of children with complex communication needs: State of the science and future researchAssistive Technology24, 34-44.

Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2012). The changing face of augmentative and alternative communication: Past, present, and future challengesAugmentative and Alternative Communication28, 197-204.

McNaughton, D., Bryen, D., Blackstone, S., Williams, M. & Kennedy, P. (2012). Young adults with complex communication needs: Research and development in AAC for a "Diverse" populationAssistive Technology24, 45 -53

Drager, K., Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2010). Effects of AAC interventions on communication and language for young children with complex communication needsJournal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, 3, 303–310.

Hughes, C., Schumaker,, J. B., McNaughton, D. B., Deshler, D. D., & Nolan, S. M. (2010). The EDIT strategy. Lawrence, KS: The University of Kansas.

McNaughton, D., & Arnold, A. (2010). Supporting positive employment outcomes for individuals who use AAC.Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 19, 51-59.

McNaughton, D., & Arnold, A., Sennot, S. & Serpentine-Clark, E. (2010). Employment and Individuals Who Use AAC. In D. McNaughton & D. Beukelman (Eds.). Transition Strategies for Adolescents and Young Adults Who Use AAC. (p. 111-132). Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing.

McNaughton, D., Balandin, S., Kennedy, P., & Sandmel, T. (2010). Health transitions for youth with complex communication needs: The importance of health literacy and communication strategiesJournal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, 3, 311–318.

McNaughton, D. B., & Beukelman, D.R. (Eds.). (2010). Transition strategies for adolescents and young adults who use AAC. Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing.

McNaughton, D., & Kennedy, P. (2010). Introduction: Key components of successful transitions. In D. McNaughton & D. Beukelman (Eds.). Transition Strategies for Adolescents and Young Adults Who Use AAC, (p.3-15). Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing.

McNaughton, D., Rackensperger, T., Wehmeyer, M., & Wright, S. (2010). Self-determination and young adults who use AAC. In D. McNaughton & D. Beukelman (Eds.), Transition Strategies for Adolescents and Young Adults Who Use AAC. (p. 17-32). Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing.

McNaughton, D., & Vostal, B. (2010). Using active listening to improve collaboration with parents: The LAFF don't CRY strategyIntervention in School and Clinic, 45, 251-256.

Finke, E. H., Finke, E. H., McNaughton, D. B., & Drager, K. D. (2009). All children can and should have the opportunity to learn: General education teachers' perspectives on including children with autism spectrum disorder who require AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25, 110–122.

Higginbotham, D. J., Beukelman, D., Blackstone, S., Bryen, D., Caves, K., Deruyter, F., et al. (2009). AAC technology transfer: An AAC-RERC report. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25, 68–76.

Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2009). Accessible Literacy Learning (ALL): Evidence-based reading instruction for learners with autism, cerebral palsy, down syndrome, and other disabilities. Pittsburgh, PA: Meyer-Johnson.

Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2009). Addressing the literacy demands of the curriculum for conventional and more advanced readers and writers who require AAC. In G. Soto & C. Zangari (Eds.), Augmentative and alternative communication in the schools (p. 217-246). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Dattilo, J., Estrella, G., Estrella, L. J., Light, J., McNaughton, D., & Seabury, M. (2008). I have chosen to live life abundantly. Perceptions of leisure by adults who use augmentative and alternative communication.Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 1, 16-28.

Light, J., McNaughton, D., Weyer, M., & Karg, L. (2008). Evidence-based literacy instruction for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: a case study of a student with multiple disabilities.Seminars in Speech and Language, 29, 110-122.

McNaughton, D., Hamlin, D., McCarthy, J., Head-Reeves, D., & Schreiner, M. (2008). Learning to listen: Teaching an active listening strategy to preservice education professionalsTopics for Early Childhood Special Education, 27, 223.

McNaughton D., Rackensperger, T., Benedek-Wood, E., & Krezman, C. Williams, M., & Light, J. (2008). A child needs to be given a chance to succeed: Parents of individuals who use AAC describe the benefits and challenges of learning AAC technologiesAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 27, 43-55.

Williams, M. B., Krezman, C., & McNaughton, D. (2008). Reach for the stars: Five principles for the next 25 years of AACAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 24, 194–206.

Light, J., McNaughton, D., Krezman, D., Williams, M., Gulens, M., Galskoy, A., & Umpleby, M. (2007). The AAC mentor project: Web-based instruction in sociorelational skills and collaborative problem solving for adults who use augmentative and alternative communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 26, 56-75.

McCarthy, J., Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2007). The effects of internet-based instruction on the social problem solving of young adults who use augmentative and alternative communicationAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 26, 100-112.

McNaughton, D., & Bryen, D. (2007). AAC technologies to enhance participation and access to meaningful societal roles for adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities who require AACAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 23, 217-229.

McNaughton, D., Symons, G., Light, J., & Parsons, A. (2006). My dream was to pay taxes: The self-employment experiences of individuals who use augmentative and alternative communicationJournal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 25, 181 - 196.

Kent-Walsh, J., & McNaughton, D. (2005). Communication partner instruction in AAC: Present practices and future directionsAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 21, 195-204.

Rackensperger, T., McNaughton D., Krezman, C. Williams, M., & D’Silva, K. (2005). When I first got I wanted to throw it over a cliff: The challenges and benefits of learning technology as described by individuals who use AACAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 21, 165-186.

Fallon, K. A., Light, J., McNaughton, D., Drager, K., & Hammer, C. (2004). The effects of direct instruction on the single-word reading skills of children who require augmentative and alternative communicationJournal of Speech Language Hearing Research, 47, 1424-1439.

Millar, D. C., Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (2004) The effect of direct instruction and writer’s workshop on the early writing skills of children who use augmentative and alternative communicationAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 20, 164-178.

McNaughton, D., Light, J., & Gulla, S. (2003). Opening up a whole new world: Employer and co-worker perspectives on working with individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 19, 235-253.

McNaughton, D., Light, J., & Arnold, K.B. (2002). Getting your 'wheel' in the door: The successful full-time employment experiences of individuals with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communicationAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 18, 59-76.

McNaughton, D., Light, J., & Groszyk, L. (2001). Don't give up": The employment experiences of adults with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who use augmentative and alternative communicationAugmentative and Alternative Communication, 17, 179-195.

Grants

Co-Investigator -- Rehabilitation Engineering Research Consortium in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation and Research, U.S. Department of Education, October, 2014- October, 2019.

Investigator -- The Penn State Children’s Communicative Competence Project: Preparing SLPs to Improve Services & Results for High Need Children with Severe Communication Disabilities, 
U.S. Department of Education, October, 2011 – October, 2016.