Dr. Roger Shouse

Dr. Roger Shouse
Phone: 8148633773
Office Address:
204F Rackley Building
University Park, PA 16802
Campus: University Park

Title

Associate Professor of Education (Educational Leadership)

Department

Education Policy Studies

Programs

Educational Leadership
Comparative and International Education

Biography

Roger Shouse began his career in 1976 as a public school teacher (math and social studies) in Detroit. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1994 and has served at Penn State since then. Spanning over 20 years, his teaching and research address organization theory, school culture, leadership theory, and more recently focus on East Asian education and school reform, critical approaches to leadership and creativity, and the analysis of cinema and other discursive works as forms of educational leadership. His current research explores how Chinese filmmakers problematize the meaning of "educational leadership" (jiaoyu lingdao). He has twice served as a visiting professor in China; at National Pingtung University of Education in Taiwan and at Sichuan University in Chengdu. Dr. Shouse serves as a Senior Associate Editor of the American Journal of Education

Representative Publications

Shouse, Roger, Bai, Jinyan, and Ma Chenwei (in press). Creativity and Leadership as Organizational Vectors: Implications for East Asian School Reform. In Routledge Handbook on Schools and Schooling in Asia, Kennedy, J.K. and Lee, J.C. (Eds.). London: Springer.

Shouse, Roger C. & Ma, Chenwei. (2015). Leadership and Creativity in East Asian Schools. Asia Pacific Education Review, 16, 4, 491-499.

Sun, Jinai & Shouse, Roger (2015). U.S. Policies and Initiatives for CFL Education. In Jie, Zhang, et al, Perspectives on Chinese as a Foreign Language Education, 47-62. New York: Springer.

Shouse, Roger C. (2013). Deschooling Twenty-first Century Education. The International Journal of Illich Studies, 3, 2, 6-16.

Shouse, Roger C. & Sun, Jinai. (2013). Friendly Habitat, Endangered Species: Ecological Theory and the Demise of a High School Mandarin Program. Educational Administration Quarterly, 49, 3. 395-420.