Research Documents and Reports

The following categories of research documents and reports are included:

 Contact the author(s) for additional information.

National Conference on Family Literacy Research Strand Proceedings

Toso, B.W. (Ed.) (2013). 22nd National Conference on Family Literacy Research Strand Conference Proceedings. Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy, The Pennsylvania State University.

Toso, B.W. (Ed.) (2012).  21st National Conference on Family Literacy Research Strand Conference Proceedings.  Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy, The Pennsylvania State University.

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 Leadership and Social Support

Prins, E. (2012).  "I don't feel alone anymore":  Social support and mental health for women in family literacy.  In B.W. Toso (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2012 National Conference on Family Literacy Research Strand (pp. 56-64).  University Park, PA:  Pennsylvania State University.

Toso, B. & Gungor, R. (2012).  Parent engagement and parent leadership.  In B.H. Wasik & B. Van Horn (Eds.),  Handbook of Family Literacy (2nd edition).  New York:  Routledge.

Prins, E., Toso, B., & Schafft, K. (2009).  "It feels a little family to me":  Social interaction and support among women in adult educations and family literacy.  Adult Education Quarterly, 59(4), 335-352.

For a summary of this article, please see the abstract or review Research Brief #2.

Toso,  B., Prins, E., Drayton, B., Gungor, R., & Gnanadass (2009).  Finding voice:  Shared decision making and student leadership in a family literacy program.  Adult Basic Education and Literacy Journal, 3(3), 151-160.

For a summary of this article, please see the abstract or review Research Brief #4.

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Family Literacy Programs

Prins, E. (2016).  Digital storytelling in adult education and family literacy:  a case study from rural Ireland.  Learning, Media and Technology.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439884.2016.1154075.

Weirauch, D. (2012).  Program improvement through action research.  In B.H. Wasik & B. Van Horn (Eds.),  Handbook of Family Literacy (2nd edition).  New York:  Routledge.

Prins, E. & Gungor, R. (2011).  Family literacy funding reductions and work-first welfare policies:  Adaptations and consequences in family literacy programs.  Adult Basic Education and Literacy Journal, 5(1), 15-25.

For a summary of this article, please see the abstract or review Research Brief #5.

Prins, E.S. (2006).  Similar, yet different:  Case studies of three Even Start programs in Pennsylvania. Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy, The Pennsylvania State University.

This research paper describes the organizational practices (e.g., recruitment, retention, instruction, program design, evaluation) of three Even Start family literacy programs in Pennsylvania, including the ways they relate and respond to their institutional environments, such as legislation and community history.

Semali, L.M. (2004).  Mapping Success:  Family and child education (FACE) Program.

Mapping Success was conceptualized as a three-phase research project that aims to develop a clear understanding of family literacy indicators of effectiveness.  A short progress report or the full paper can be found here.

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Family Literacy Participation

Kassab, C., & Prins, E. (2013).  How involvement in adult education and family literacy programs shapes women's social networks, social support, and mental health.  In E. P. Isaac-Savage, J. Jordan, K. Foushee, C. Hickman, & B. Shannon-Simms (Eds.), Proceedings of the 54th Annual Adult Education Research Conference (pp. 239-245).  St. Louis:  University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Prins, E. & Van Horn, B. (2012).  Adult learning in family literacy:  Special considerations for women learners.  In B.H. Wasik & B. Van Horn (Eds.),  Handbook of Family Literacy (2nd edition).  New York:  Routledge.

Prins, E., Carrera, M., Drayton, B., Gungor, R., Miller, F., & Spencer, T. (2011, June).  Women's involvement in adult education and family literacy:  Consequences for social networks, social support, and mental health.  In S.  Carpenter, S. Dossa, & B.J. Osborne (Eds.), Proceedings of the 52nd National Conference of the Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the 30th National Conference of the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE) (pp. 543-549).  Toronto, Ontario:  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

Schafft, K. & Prins, E. (2009).  Poverty, residential mobility, and persistence across urban and rural family literacy programs in Pennsylvania.  Adult Basic Education and Literacy Journal, 3(1), 3-12.

For a summary of this article, please see the abstract or review Research Brief #1.

This study was undertaken in collaboration with the Center on Rural Education and Communities, and was funded through a Research Initiation Grant, College of Education, Pennsylvania State University ($8900).

Askov, E.N., Kassab, C., Weirauch, D.  (2005).  Women in Pennsylvania's family literacy programs:  Effects of participant characteristics on extent of participation. Adult Basic Education, 15(3), 131-149.

Kassab, C., Askov, E.N., Weirauch, D., Grinder, E., & Van Horn, B. (2004).  Adult participation related to outcomes in family literacy programs.  Family Literacy Forum, 3(1), 23-29.

For a summary, please review the annotation for this article.

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Parenting and Interactive Literacy Activities 

Prins,E., & Toso, B. (2008).  Defining and measuring parenting for educational success:  A critical discourse analysis of the parent education profile.  American Educational Research Journal, 45(3), 555-596.

For a summary of this article, please see the abstract or review Research Brief #3.

Grinder, E.L., Longoria Saenz, E., Askov, E.N., & Aldemir, J. (2005).  What's happening during the parent-child interactive literacy component of family literacy programs?  Family Literacy Forum, 4(1), 12-18.

For a summary, please review the annotation for this article.

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Impact of Family Literacy on Children

Askov, E.N., Grinder, E.L., & Kassab, C. (2005).  Impact of family literacy on children (update section).  Family Literacy Forum, 4(1), 38-39.

For a summary, please review the annotation for this article.

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 Tools and Resources

Interactive Literacy/PACT Observation Tool, Instruction Manual and Tool

This instrument, piloted in Pennsylvania Family Literacy sites, is useful as a teacher training tool.  Experienced teachers may also find it helpful in focusing parent-child interactive literacy instruction.  It is intended to encourage teacher reflection rather than be used for teacher evaluation, and to be used twice or more per year.  The instrument requires an observer and a teacher before, during, and after the interactive literacy time.

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