College of Education > News and Publications > 2015: 04-06 news > College of Education student receives $5,000 fellowship

College of Education student receives $5,000 fellowship

Latoya Haynes-Thoby, a graduate student in Penn State’s College of Education, recently was selected for the National Board for Certified Counselors’ Minority Fellowship Program-Youth (MFP-Y).

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Latoya Haynes-Thoby, a graduate student in Penn State’s College of Education, recently was selected for the National Board for Certified Counselors’ Minority Fellowship Program-Youth (MFP-Y). Given by the NBCC Foundation, the fellowship provides funding and training that will support Haynes-Thoby’s education and facilitate her service to underserved minority populations, with a specific focus on transition-age youth (ages 16–25).

A native of Philadelphia, Haynes-Thoby studies clinical mental health in schools and communities as part of the counseling education graduate program. She will begin her doctoral studies with Penn State this fall while continuing to provide counseling services to the community. She looks forward to seeking opportunities to provide counseling services to both students and transition-age youth, she said.

Haynes-Thoby is one of 40 master’s-level counseling students selected to receive the $5,000 fellowship award. This fellowship will allow her to prepare herself to provide optimal and current services to her communities.

 “Helping communities to attain mental health wellness is very important to me,” Haynes-Thoby said. “I feel extremely grateful for the opportunity to receive training through NBCC while studying at Penn State, in order to continue to provide services to the community.”

The NBCC MFP-Y is made possible by a grant awarded to NBCC by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in September 2014. The NBCC Foundation is contracted by NBCC to administer the NBCC MFP-Y, as well as training and collaboration activities, such as webinars, that are open to all National Certified Counselors. The goal of the program is to reduce health disparities and improve behavioral health care outcomes for racially and ethnically diverse populations by increasing the available number of culturally competent behavioral health professionals.

 To learn more about the NBCC MFP and its fellows, visit www.nbccf.org.

By Jessica Buterbaugh (April 2015)