College of Education > News and Publications > Events Folder > Waterbury Lecture Series: Fostering Creativity in Interdisciplinary Learning Spaces

Waterbury Lecture Series: Fostering Creativity in Interdisciplinary Learning Spaces

Professor Nancy J. Nersessian from the Dept. of Cognitive Science at Georgia Institute of Technology will present a lecture for the Waterbury Series on April 19, 2013, in the Krause Innovation Studio.

When: Apr 19, 2013 from 04:00 PM to 06:00 PM

Where: Krause Innovation Studio, Chambers Building

Contact: Jennifer Glasgow, , 814-865-1807

Add to calendar: vCal | iCal

Dr Nancy J NersessianDr. Nancy J. Nersessian of the Department of Cognitive Science at Georgia Institute of Technology will present a lecture for the Waterbury Series on April 19, 2013, in the Krause Innovation Studio. In this talk, she will address what factors promote or impede creativity and innovation for novice scientific researchers. A reception is scheduled to follow the lecture.

Professor Nersessian's research group addresses this complex question through an analysis of socio-cultural, methodological, cognitive, and interactional factors and epistemic values. Drawing from twelve years of research on cognitive and learning practices in pioneering interdisciplinary bioengineering sciences laboratories in university settings, the talk describes features of what is called agentive learning environments that empower graduate students to direct their own learning and problem solving.

Dr. Nancy J. Nersessian is Regents’ Professor and Professor of Cognitive Science at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She has received numerous grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and other organizations. She has held several residential fellowship positions, most recently at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. In 2011, she received the inaugural Patrick Suppes Award in Philosophy of Science from the American Philosophical Society for her book, Creating Scientific Concepts (MIT, 2008). In 2012, Science as Psychology: Sense-making and Identity in Science Practice (Cambridge, 2011; co-authored with her research lab members) received the William James Book Award from the American Psychological Association.

Her research focuses on the creative research practices of scientists and engineers, especially how developing models leads to fundamentally new ways of understanding the world. Her current work seeks to understand the dynamic interplay of cognition and culture in interdisciplinary engineering sciences laboratories and the ways these laboratories foster and sustain creative and innovative practices. Dr. Nersessian draws on her research findings to design novel teaching methods that foster creativity in complex and rapidly advancing scientific domains.

The Pennsylvania State University encourages qualified persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities. If you anticipate needing any type of accommodation or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact Jennifer Glasgow, 814-865-1807, jsg17@psu.edu, in advance of your participation or visit. Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce.