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Saxe Named Winner of Fulbright Scholarship

David Saxe won a Fulbright scholarship to Germany

saxe_sml.jpgby Joe Savrock (March 2009)

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – David W. Saxe, associate professor of social studies education, has been named a Fulbright Senior Scholar to lecture and conduct research in Germany next year.

Saxe will teach America History and Cultural Studies at the University of Regensburg in Bavaria, Germany, from January to August 2010. His research project is titled “National Socialism as Presented in Germany’s Four Major National Heritage Museums.”

The Fulbright Scholarship Program was established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the rest of the world.

Saxe is a nationally recognized expert on history standards. He has published widely on the history of American history teaching.

Recently he began work on two newly funded research projects. The first, titled “Heritage Education: Fred Waring and the Golden Age of Radio, 1944,” is funded by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. This project will produce curricular and program materials related to Waring's radio program in the World War II era, as presented at the Vanderbilt Theater in New York City circa 1944. Several Penn State students will assist with this project, which runs through June 2010.

The other project, funded by the Apgar Foundation, is titled “Heritage Education Interpretation: Captain James Potter, Pennsylvania’s Forest Wars, and the Beginning of the American Nation.” This work is to be presented at Penn State’s Arboretum in collaboration with students enrolled in several Social Studies courses. The project is designed to provide a cultural interpretation of the proposed forty-two acre Hartley Woodlot, which is currently being developed at the new Arboretum. The Hartley Woodlot will feature a number of “old-growth” trees, some dating to the 17th century.