College of Education > News and Publications > News: Oct - Dec 2014 > Tutoring through Technology: Education is Online in the College of Education

Tutoring through Technology: Education is Online in the College of Education

Penn State students helped elementary and middle-school English language learners from Hazleton One Community Center in Hazleton, Pennsylvania to develop their language, literacy and math skills during virtual tutoring sessions in the College of Education’s course titled CI 280: Teaching English Language Learners.
Tutoring through Technology: Education is Online in the College of Education

Kevin Lynch and his partner chat with their Hazleton student on a laptop computer.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.— Penn State students gained hands-on experience with English language learners (ELLs) during virtual tutoring sessions in the College of Education's Krause Innovation Studio. During the tutoring sessions, Penn State students help elementary and middle-school students from the Hazleton One Community Center in Hazleton, Pennsylvania, to develop their language, literacy and math skills. The online tutoring sessions are a part of the College of Education's course titled CI 280: Teaching English Language Learners (ELLs).

Students video chatting with English language learner
Kevin Lynch and his partner chat with their Hazleton student on a laptop computer.

"CI 280 was developed as the result of a state mandate that requires all education majors (and others entering related fields) to take a course related to working with ELLs," said Professor in Charge Megan Hopkins. "Although the state does not require a field experience in the course, research has shown the benefits of such experience for pre-service teachers' development of positive attitudes toward ELLs and knowledge of how to teach them effectively."

Two of the 10 sections of CI 280 include the virtual tutoring component.

"The tutors develop a relationship with someone who likely comes from a different cultural and linguistic background than their own," Hopkins said. "They learn that they must attend to each ELL's needs individually and understand the academic, social, cultural and linguistic factors that affect ELL's success in school."

To learn more, view pictures from the photo gallery.

By  (November 2014)